Antidote for the toxicity of human cognition, “feel” and “fair” are 4-letter f-words

Our minds are stubborn about how we emotionally react to dissatisfactions, optimistic that resolution and happiness lies somewhere within the persistent obsession about how we feel. Get a dose of Dr. Lastname (Harvard degrees (MD) in psychiatry and Latin)

Who hasn’t obsessed about the areas where he or she feels lacking? If one ever complains, it likely involves how one feels about what they’re unhappy with, what conflicts their idea of fairness, what should be happening but isn’t, and why are unfortunate events happening to them. It’s logical to think answers to said questions will unlock the complicated vault of conundrums of an individual. Yet, society keeps feeling disappointment, we insist on the righteousness to the fairest situation, and believing we can achieve perfection should we obsess enough. STOP FEELING. This article is an eye opener for how our cognition may wire us to our own downfall.

In the event that you reserve the right to refuse rejecting your feelings. Ponder this: chronic mental health problems can be medically treated just like chronic physical health problems. The point is, there is no cure for these anomalies. A diabetic’s life is not perfect like that of a healthy individual, he or she has to go through the hassle of daily insulin injections. But his or her life is only the best it can be because of the hassle (should it be taken).

With chronic physical illnesses, i.e. allergies, high blood pressure, venereal diseases, and diabetes, our bodies accept that it has a problem that can’t be cured or reversed, and subsequently accept that medication is the next best thing. The brain has had a lot of rep for having high capacities and tolerances, but it’s having difficulty accepting truths and being beneficially functional. With psychiatric problems on the rise in America, maybe our the mental potential should be redirected. Take a lesson from the physical body, which operates simpler than the mind but has amazing capacities nonetheless: whatever depresses you, disappoints you, ¬†frustrates you; accept that it is life. You can’t change what has happened, and it will mean that you assume responsibility for your misery of you try to convince yourself that you can change what reality says you can’t. ¬†Instead, coexist with it, acknowledge that it is real then move on. Reserve obsession for things you can control to better or balance the things you can’t. Unlike the physical body, it isn’t as easy to recognize what is worth our effort to fight (bacteria), or simply put up with it in the best way (virus). Be mindful about where you allocate your thoughts and remember the most basic cognitive lesson: negative actions cause negative feelings, and negative feelings has just as much power to transcend to negative behavior. Brighten up, poor thing. Stop dwelling!

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